The Alamo Bride by Kathleen Y’Barbo

The Alamo Bride by author Kathleen Y’Barbo is Book Seven in the Christian historical romance fiction series Daughters of the Mayflower.  Each book in this lovely series is tied together by heritage but may be read as a stand alone.

The first thing of notice is the beautiful cover.  It vividly says Texas and 1800’s.  If I chose books simply by cover, this one would make the cut.  It is a 256 page paperback published by Barbour Books.

For me, it was a bit of a slow read at the beginning.  It took me about a third of the book to become invested and then it morphed into a page turned.  The story has been well researched.  I learned some things about the time period and area that I did not know.  Texas was a rugged, untamed land in 1836 as were the people.

The author does a wonderful job weaving her Christian message throughout this book.  Characters mention trusting God and turning to Him.   The message of faith is clear in this book.  I did not have to search for it.  This is also a book about family.  It is refreshing to read a Christian fiction and know it is one.  While the inspiration is clear, the book is not preachy or overbearing.

The author has written well rounded characters that are relatable and vividly described. They jumped off of the pages and were easy to imagine.  Ellis, the heroine, is sassy and became someone I wanted to know.  I became invested in her story, and then I did not want to put the book down.

There were twists, turns, surprises, romance, spying, intrigue, action, and history.  Yes, that is a lot packed into one paperback book.  I enjoyed it and definitely recommend it.  Anyone that enjoys history, romance, or Texas will be thrilled to find this offering from talented author Y’Barbo.  With the fighting I would not recommend it to young readers.  It earned a 4 out of 5 stars from me.

A copy was provided by Barbour but no review was required.  These are my own, honest thoughts.

About the Book

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Will Ellis Lose All at the Alamo?
Ellis Dumont finds a man in New Orleans Grey unconscious on Dumont property in 1836. As his fevers rage, the man mutters strange things about treasures and war. Either Claiborne Gentry has lost his mind or he’s a spy for the American president—or worse, for the Mexican enemy that threatens their very lives. With the men of her family away, Ellis must stand courageous and decide who she can trust. Will she put her selfish wants ahead of the future of the republic or travel with Clay to Mission San Jose to help end the war?

Join the adventure as the Daughters of the Mayflower series continues with The Alamo Bride by Kathleen Y’Barbo.

More in the Daughters of the Mayflower series:
The Mayflower Bride by Kimberley Woodhouse – set 1620 Atlantic Ocean (February 2018)
The Pirate Bride by Kathleen Y’Barbo – set 1725 New Orleans (April 2018)
The Captured Bride by Michelle Griep – set 1760 during the French and Indian War (June 2018)
The Patriot Bride by Kimberley Woodhouse – set 1774 Philadelphia (August 2018)​
The Cumberland Bride by Shannon McNear – set 1794 on the Wilderness Road (October 2018)
The Liberty Bride by MaryLu Tyndall – set 1814 Baltimore (December 2018)
The Alamo Bride by Kathleen Y’Barbo – set 1836 Texas (February 2019)

About the Author

2B712767-6AA3-44E1-919F-FFC70C81A061Bestselling author Kathleen Y’Barbo is a multiple Carol Award and RITA nominee of more than eighty novels with almost two million copies in print in the US and abroad.

A tenth-generation Texan and certified paralegal, she has been nominated for a Career Achievement Award as well a Reader’s Choice Award and is the winner of the Inspirational Romance of the Year by Romantic Times magazine.

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